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AIKIDO IS A DIALOGUE OF NATURAL MOVEMENT

 

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BRIEF HISTORY

As a new topic, many students will have conjured up all sorts of thoughts of what Aikido is, and most of thoughts are probably correct.  Aikido means different things to different people.  To avoid confusion we must first look into its history.

References to the original form, "AIKI JUJUTSU", date back to 1150ad.  This fighting form was closely guarded by the heads of Japanese Clans in Feudal times and was only taught to the knights of the Clan.  The close combat weapons used in those days were, swords, spears, staffs knives to name a few.  In general fighting was carried out in close quarters.  Today, as we have seen in recent times, battle is fought at distant and with explosive weapons such as guns & bombs etc.  To use a Martial Art against such devices would be pointless.  So the reasons for learning a Martial Art today are entirely different from the original reasons.  Today it is more about leisure and in essence the spirit of what once was.  From this we can practise and become skilful with a more useful purpose.  This purpose is the development of body and mind for the good of all.

In the early part of this century Morihei Ueshiba (Founder if Aikido) practised AIKI JUJUTSU and from this he derived his original form "AIKI BUJUTSU".  By 1942, "AIKIDO", as it was then to be named, was officially recognised and was know as the way of harmony.

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RANDORI SYSTEM FOR AIKIDO
Originally the AIKI JUJUTSU form had no simple learning process and there were many hundreds of techniques many of which were deadly and violent.  Morihei Ueshiba's AIKIDO reduced the number to some 2664 variations on 30 basic movements and using safer techniques.  Students could then repeatedly practice without the fear of permanent injury, but still keeping in mind the origins of the techniques.  Kenji Tomiki, a student of Morihei Ueshiba and like his master he too was an expert in Judo.  He took this a stage further and devised a simpler and more systematic method of teaching Aikido efficiently from the knowledge and correct application of far fewer techniques.  One of his aims was to introduce the element of competition or free-play (Randori), something not previously acknowledged by Aikidoka.  By the mid 1960's he had achieved this and several colleges took part in a competition.  The analogy being similar to that of Judo, which was developed by Kano for younger players with a competitive and sporting element in mind.

The BUDO MAN diagram shows the origins and refinements of AIKIDO and how it relates to other disciplines.  It shows how the techniques are grouped and how they overlap with Judo.  Furthermore it highlights the key elements for safe and effective application of Randori.

SOFTNESS / MOVEMENT, BALANCE & POSTURE

BUDO MAN by Adrian Tyndale
(click on image to expand)
ROOTS HISTORY
Professor Tomiki 1900 - 1979 Masashige Kusunoki  1294 - 1336
YAMADA SENSEI JOHN WAITE SHIHAN
ETIQUETTE KIKUSUI KAI established in the UK 1959
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02 December 2009

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